Class Starters

Early last fall the speech-language pathologist I collaborate with suggested occasionally starting class with a short pop quiz for extra credit based on the material from the previous night’s homework. I don’t recall what issue it was meant to address, but I think it had something to do with students needing additional incentives/reinforcement to practice solving the problems accurately.

Here’s how they worked. The quizzes were usually 4-6 questions, with each question worth half-a-point added onto their homework score. Since they were worth extra credit, I didn’t guarantee plentiful time to complete them; when I needed to move on, it was time to pass the quizzes in. (Again, whining from the mathematically anxious crowd. And the chronically late crowd.) We didn’t discuss them together, but I passed them back, marked, the next day.

From a class management standpoint I liked that the quizzes helped get class started and reminded the students what kind of information they would be held accountable for. It also succeeded at giving students who completed their homework an extra chance to show what they had learned and boost their grades.

Because I didn’t want to offer extra credit all the time but I still wanted something to help get class started and give prepared students an extra chance to show what they had learned, I started doing “problems on the board” on off days. For these I simply spread problems of varying difficulty levels across the board and told the students to find one they felt comfortable solving, grab a dry-erase marker, and solve it on the board. Unlike the pop quizzes, these we did go over together after everyone was done. A couple additional benefits of this technique were that it started class with a bit of self-assessment as each student determined which problem to volunteer for and a little full-body motion as they went up to the board and solved it.

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